Course listing

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Drawing

DR150
Drawing I
3 credits  6 Hours

Drawing I is a two-semester course that presents drawing as the visually accurate representation of three-dimensional forms in space on a two-dimensional surface.  By drawing still-life objects both singly and assorted under various lighting conditions, students are taught to see proportions and confirm their observations with measurements.  Students also learn how spatial relationships are checked horizontally and vertically, and how negative shapes are sought out and used to define and confirm positives.  Finally, in progressing from simple geometric forms to the more complex (including the human figure) students acquire an integrated, systematic, and effective approach to the construction of an accurate drawing through line and value.

Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

DR155
Drawing I
3 credits  6 Hours

Drawing I is a two-semester course that presents drawing as the visually accurate representation of three-dimensional forms in space on a two-dimensional surface.  By drawing still-life objects both singly and assorted under various lighting conditions, students are taught to see proportions and confirm their observations with measurements.  Students also learn how spatial relationships are checked horizontally and vertically, and how negative shapes are sought out and used to define and confirm positives.  Finally, in progressing from simple geometric forms to the more complex (including the human figure) students acquire an integrated, systematic, and effective approach to the construction of an accurate drawing through line and value.

Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

Optional Texts:
Responsive Drawing, Nathan Goldstein
The Art of Drawing, Bernard Chaet
A Guide to Drawing, Daniel M. Mendelowitz

prerequisite: DR150
DR210
Figure Drawing I
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is an introduction to essential and effective figure drawing procedures. Sound life drawing practices are established and acquired by transcribing visual information gathered through select, focused observations made from a fixed position. Observation-based strategies involving selection and emphasis, grouping, the establishment of spatial depth, size calibrations and eye level are pursued. Consistent with an observational approach, the aptness of constructional procedures that establish figural mass or trajectory, or that vivify additional planar contrasts, is also addressed.

Drawing majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $30.00

prerequisite: DR155
DR215
Calligraphic Drawing
1.5 credits  3 Hours

An introduction to drawing as representation through graphic symbols. Ways that the hand and its acquired cursive habits propel graphic representations and ideas are demonstrated. Through the in-depth study of a variety of precedents, the role that calligraphic dynamism and acuity play in stimulating observation and spurring inventiveness is established and experienced. Students’ own cursive habits are buoyed through free-hand copying and internalization of examples, and by applying them in both figure drawings and in on-site landscape drawings.  Emphasis is also placed on formal creativity through the calligraphically propelled invention of scenes and objects.

Drawing majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $185.00

prerequisite: DR155
DR240
Printmaking A, Printmaking Survey
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Why does printmaking continue to engage artists throughout history?  What can we learn from the reversed image, the transferred image, or the image in multiple and how can the media of intaglio, monoprints, and relief carry and advance our visual intentions?  This course will cover these topics as well as technical demonstrations and assignments to stimulate and advance one’s imagery.  The course will alternate work periods with critical analysis, historical information and context.  We will use the direct drawing experience as the core to technical development in each medium.  Communal studio protocol and safety will be stressed.  Repeatable for credit.
Printmaking lab fee: $50.00
Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

prerequisite: DR155
DR241
Printmaking B, Monotype and Lithography
1.5 credits  3 Hours

As a base for drawing exploration, monotype and lithography offer special qualities in the print medium.  Monotype is a singular print that offers flexibility and a more immediate translation of a drawing while stone lithography offers a slower more modulated technique with a repeatable print result.  Both mediums can result in a luminous surface and be effective means to translate and create drawing concerns of the artist.  Progressively complex monochromatic methods will be introduced including additive and subtractive and ghost image techniques in monoprint and crayon and maniere noire drawings in lithography.  Focus is on composition and expression of graphic ideas.  Five resolved prints in portfolio presentation is the final goal.  Repeatable for credit.
Printmaking lab fee: $50.00
Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

prerequisite: DR155
DR242
Printmaking C, Relief and Intaglio
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Progressing from simple monochromatic and tonal parameters in both relief and intaglio, the course investigates color mixture in reduction relief prints and multi-plate intaglio prints.  The goal is to examine color mood, color mixture, and color spatial readings in each.  Methods include woodcut, linocut, drypoint, line etching, soft ground etching prints and aquatint.  A final portfolio of five resolved images is the outcome.  Repeatable for credit.
Printmaking lab fee: $50.00
Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

prerequisite: DR155
DR24X
Printmaking
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The College offers a range of printmaking courses.  Please review the semester’s course schedule for specific information regarding topic, the instructor of record, and time/days offered.
Printmaking lab fee: $50.00

DR265
Drawing from Perspective
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course provides a framework for students to draw multi-level, believable spaces without relying exclusively on direct observation. Imagination is the key ingredient in the construction of interesting, even fanciful, environments within which and with which figures might interact. Students are taught how to adorn and populate these spaces, drawing from a limitless variety of sources, both real and imaginary, creating a seamless, visually credible work of art.

prerequisite: DR150DR155PER150
DR275
Scenic Drawing
3 credits  6 Hours

Drawing strategies are established and applied in meeting the artistic challenges of creating whole pictures.  In a variety of formats, including studio set-ups, on-site landscape and imaginative composition, successful over-all pictorialization is pursued as an effect of artistic completeness and unity to which each pictorial element and part has contributed.

Estimated cost of materials: $50.00

prerequisite: DR155
DR277
Independent Drawing Projects
3 credits  6 Hours

Working with the course instructor as an advisor, individual students envision a creative path and realize drawings over the course of the semester that deepen their involvement in an independently developed area of artistic concern.  Regular class meetings and discussions provide feedback for the benefit of the on-going work, which, together with these meetings, is understood to entail nine dedicated hours each week.  Outcomes take a form determined by the student working in conjunction with the course instructor and, as such, may be comprised by a single work according to a pre-established format or a series of works, and may involve either the concentrated or a more diversified use of drawing media.  Trips to exhibitions of drawings, to museum prints & drawings study rooms and/or to artists’ studios are scheduled.  At semester’s end, Independent Drawing Projects students convene to present and discuss their work. 
Drawing majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $50.00

prerequisite: DR210DR215
DR320
Figure Drawing II
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Through poses of varying length as well as through the study of examples, practice is gained in representing the human figure as a series of Euclidean-type volumes that are interlocked and yet moving, each in its own clearly demonsrated trajectory.  Specific approaches, conventions and schemas for drawing the human form as a set of spatially related units are covered.  Constructional strategies for filtering, simplifying and graphically vivifying anatomical phenomena are also presented.

Drawing majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.

prerequisite: DR210
DR335
Figure Drawing III
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The study and application of ideas pertaining to the representation of bodily movement.  Specific strategies are discussed and practiced for fusing multiple poses/views in a single figure in order to create, upon the page, a compelling and convincing figural fiction that advances students’ independently developed expressive aims.  The artistic impact and import of the free but purposive orchestration/exaggeration of visual forms, including the re-setting of proportions, invented anatomical transitions, and forms created through calligraphic sequencing are also explored.

Drawing majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.

prerequisite: DR320
DR345
Chiaroscuro Drawing
3 credits  6 Hours

An exploration of two key and contrasting approaches to the representation of light in drawings and of ways specific drawing media are deployed in connection with each.  The first approach is based on brightness levels, calibrated according to a global scale. The second approach is based on brightness changes, providing opportunities for the representation of light through linear, rather than tonal, means.  The disparate artistic impact and potential of these approaches is discussed and demonstrated through the appraisal of examples, and in a variety of studio-based work, including figure drawing and invented and observed scenes.

Drawing majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $75.00

prerequisite: DR210DR215DR275
DR350
Extended Pose Life Drawing
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Poses of longer duration provide an opportunity to address key figure drawing objectives, including organization of effects of light, clarification of figure/ground, planar, axial and other spatial relationships, resolution of detail-mass relationships, figure completeness, and aptness of selection and emphasis. The clear organization of perceptual material, rather than optical copying, is presented as an effective means of realization in representations of the human form.

prerequisite: DR155
DR360
Large Scale Life Drawing
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Key figure drawing objectives are set in relation to the representation of the human figure on a large scale. Practical considerations regarding uses of media in large-scale presentations as well as artistic considerations related to the achievement of figural presence through life-size scale are addressed. Means by which the large-scale figure’s powerfully direct appeal to the viewer are conveyed, including frontality, orthogonal “address” and the continuity of real and fictive dimensions, are established and developed.

prerequisite: DR155DR210
DR370
Rapid-Pose Life Drawing
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Key figure drawing objectives are set in relation to the representation of a live model in briefly-held poses.  Pre-set figural templates, cursive and geometrical patterning as well as graphic symbols denoting plane, mass and trajectory are deployed in rapid-response drawings.

prerequisite: DR210
DR375
Landscape Drawing
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Calligraphic and observational approaches are taken to landscape in both wet and dry media.  On-site work as well as fully-realized scenes representing the artistic synthesis of elements both recorded and imagined are explored.

prerequisite: DR215
DR382
Narrative Drawing
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This seminar/studio course gives students the opportunity to study and apply modes of drawing that activate, rather than merely format, narrative.  Through instructor presentations, readings, the close study of drawings, and through students’ own drawings graphic ideas are presented and explored for bringing pictorial elements into visual relationships that not merely relate, but also spark, narrative.  A wide variety of narrative works from Renaissance Cycles to the modern graphic novel are studied in order to demonstrate how a drawing’s graphic or visual character, especially when novel or distinctive, creates thematic content and opens up new narrative domains. Students are afforded the opportunity, both through their own creative work and through special presentations on artists of their choosing, to enlarge the scope of the topic areas.

Drawing majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.

prerequisite: DR215DR275DR320
DR490
Senior Studio
4.5 credits  9 Hours

The Senior Studio course is an opportunity for BFA students in their final year of study to deploy skills and concepts learned throughout their educational experience in generating work or works for the Senior Exhibition that achieve independently conceived artistic goals. The production and development of artwork through disciplined studio practice is supported and evaluated through individual weekly consultations with faculty members and through periodic group critiques. End of term critiques with faculty and peers serve to highlight individual progress. (In keeping with the course’s credit structure, students dedicate 13.5 hours per week to fulfill course requirements.)

Prerequisite: Successful (a grade of C- or above) completion of DR480.

DR495
Senior Studio
4.5 credits  9 Hours

The Senior Studio course is an opportunity for BFA students in their final year of study to deploy skills and concepts learned throughout their educational experience in generating work or works for the Senior Exhibition that achieve independently conceived artistic goals. The production and development of artwork through disciplined studio practice is supported and evaluated through individual weekly consultations with faculty members and through periodic group critiques. End of term critiques with faculty and peers serve to highlight individual progress. (In keeping with the course’s credit structure, students dedicate 13.5 hours per week to fulfill course requirements.)

Prerequisite: Successful (a grade of C- or above) completion of DR490.

prerequisite: DR490
DRXXX
Drawing Options
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Students can take either DR215, DR24X, DR277, DR320, DR335, DR345, or DR382 to satisfy this requirement. Please consult those course descriptions for prerequisites.

DRXXX
Drawing Options
3 credits  6 Hours

Students can take either DR215, DR24X, DR277, DR320, DR335, DR345, or DR382 to satisfy this requirement. Please consult those course descriptions for prerequisites. A combination of two 1.5 credit courses on this listing may be taken to satisfy this requirement.

Painting

PT100
Painting I
3 credits  6 Hours

This two-semester foundation course provides students with the skills necessary to paint convincing forms in space.  Using oil paint, students proceed through a series of sequential assignments designed to promote a thorough understanding of value, temperature, and color and introduce them to other formal conventions employed by painters.  Students develop an intelligent, reliable approach to painting; a familiarity with basic materials, techniques, and composition; and a deeper understanding of color theory.
Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

PT105
Painting I
3 credits  6 Hours

This two-semester foundation course provides students with the skills necessary to paint convincing forms in space.  Using oil paint, students proceed through a series of sequential assignments designed to promote a thorough understanding of value, temperature, and color and introduce them to other formal conventions employed by painters.  Students develop an intelligent, reliable approach to painting; a familiarity with basic materials, techniques, and composition; and a deeper understanding of color theory.
Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

prerequisite: PT100 
PT161
2D Design
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Students are introduced to the elements and principles of two-dimensional design, learning to recognize, identify, and apply them to their own work.  Through problem-solving exercises and analysis of compositions, students will develop an intellectual and practical understanding of the construction of a work of art, expand their color sensibility and vocabulary, and broaden their understanding of the visual and verbal language of design and color.
Estimated cost of materials: $185.00
Required Text:
The Critique Handbook, Buster & Crawford, ISBN-10: 0131505440, Retail $26.00
Optional Texts:
Launching the Imagination, Mary Stewart.
The Elements of Color, Johannes Itten, 1970.
Design Language, Tim McCreight.

PT165
Color and Design
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course provides a thorough examination of color theory. Students are introduced to various color contrasts through a series of exercises, which allow them to use color more coherently.

PT212
Introduction to Digital Imaging
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course is an intensive introduction to the world of digital imaging through the use of Adobe Photoshop CS.  Students will create and develop digital images from scratch using drawing and painting techniques, collage, masking, compositing, and precise color adjustment, all while integrating solid visual design principles and conceptual strategies for the purposes of making art.

PT220
Watercolor Painting
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The course is designed to benefit a variety of art students who are at different stages in their knowledge of painting in watercolor. Progressing quickly from basics to more advanced elements in the use of the watercolor medium, students learn the practical application of color, value, and composition as they apply to watercolor painting.

PT230
Pastel
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course addresses the formal and practical construction of pastel painting.  Color theory and mixing will be explored though various methods and techniques unique to the pastel medium.  In addition to exploring various compositional strategies, practical application of color and value will be developed through still life, landscape, and portrait studies. Students will be encouraged to identify and pursue spatial organization and chromatic contrasts consistent with their own expressive needs.

Estimated cost of materials: $110.00

prerequisite: DR155  PT105 
PT250
Landscape Painting
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course is open to all painting media. Its focus is on composition, value, color, and the simplification and integration of landscape motifs on the picture plane. Students will work on location and in the studio with frequent studio critiques.

Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

prerequisite: DR155  PT105 
PT260
Painting II: Painting from Observation
3 credits  6 Hours

Working from direct observation, students will broaden their visual vocabulary by developing a more sophisticated utility of formal painting elements and techniques.  Students will utilize painting devices such as lost and found edges, color as form and space, value hierarchies and shapes, and the control of painterly surface in order to obtain desired space, subject characterization, mood and design.  Venues will include landscape, studio set ups, and interior spaces.
Painting majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $225.00
Optional texts: The Artist’s Handbook of Materials and Techniques, Ralph Mayer. 
An Artist’s Notebook: Techniques and Materials, Bernard Chaet. 
Artist Beware: The Hazards in Working with All Art and Craft Materials and the Precautions Every Artist and Craftsperson Should Take, by Michael McCann.

prerequisite: DR155  PT105 
PT265
Painting II: Figure
3 credits  6 Hours

This course addresses the composition and construction of figure paintings.  Using a variety of poses and durations, students will learn essential strategies to interpret the figure, first in gestural terms and then more fully realized forms.  Using multiple poses, students will develop multi-figure compositions while solving problems of equilibrium, pattern, spatial relationships and movement.  Perspective will aid in the organization of space and forms, applied to both observed and imported environments.

Painting majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

Optional Texts:
The Artist’s Handbook of Materials and Techniques, Ralph Mayer. 
An Artist’s Notebook: Techniques and Materials, Bernard Chaet. 
Artist Beware: The Hazards in Working with All Art and Craft Materials and the Precautions Every Artist and Craftsperson Should Take, by Michael McCann. 

PT270
Figure Painting I
3 credits  6 Hours

This course addresses essential figure painting skills as the student learns to construct effective human forms in a believable space.  Formal strategies of compositional design, such as relative proportion or color-as-form, will be introduced and explored.  As students learn to utilize the figure as a dynamic element of picture making, various methods and techniques will aid the student in constructing not only competent paintings of figures, but also well-executed figure paintings.

Estimated cost of materials: $199.00

prerequisite: DR155  PT105 
PT285
Still Life
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This studio course addresses the application of various painting, color, and design conventions through still life subjects.  Uses of color, composition, juxtaposition of subject articles, text, and their effect on content will be examined.

Estimated cost of materials: $50.00

prerequisite: DR155  PT105 
PT295
EggTempera
1.5 credits  4.5 Hours

EggTempera is an ancient luminous medium that emphasizes pure color and fine drawing. Made with egg yolk as binder and mineral pigments as color, Tempera has many of the glazing qualities of oil paint, yet is water-based, fast drying and optically brilliant. This class is a comprehensive study of the technique of egg tempera and its unique properties, geared to give students a deep understanding of both traditional and contemporary methods. This includes preparing wood panels from start to finish: traditional gesso preparation; creating egg tempera paint from dry pigments and egg yolk; recipes and techniques for egg and oil mediums; multiple techniques of applying egg tempera; as well as a wealth of historical information surrounding the tradition. Students will complete several paintings, from life and/or independently conceived ideas.

Estimated cost of materials: $150.00

prerequisite: DR155  PT105 
PT330
Methods and Materials of Painting
3 credits  6 Hours

Materials and techniques comprise the visual language artists use to communicate.  Understanding how the language intrinsic in all materials carries content through its very materiality – its history, nature, personality and context – is essential for all artists.  Through lecture, demonstration and primarily hands-on participation, this course will study the technique and applications of a wide range of painting materials, historic to modern, making the connection between material and content palpable, useful, and available to the student for exploration in developing their artistic voice.  As much as possible, students will create the materials and explore possibilities of their use, effect, and relationship to their work.  Techniques covered include distemper, watercolor, egg tempera, oil, encaustic, fresco, including ancient and contemporary applications and their differing effects; supports include paper, panel, and canvas in multiple preparations; and proper understanding and exploration of tools.  Includes an in-depth discussion of studio hazards/safety and conservation materials to promote a long and safe working life, archival preparation, use and storage for long-lasting artwork. 
Required Text:
The Painter’s Handbook, M.D. Gottsegen, ISBN-10: 0823034968, ISBN-13: 978-0-82303-496-3, Retail Price: $24.95
Estimated cost of materials: $399.00

prerequisite: PT260 
PT335
Large Scale Painting
3 credits  6 Hours

Students will apply various compositional strategies to develop dynamic and imposing images.Issues of appropriation as well as various methods of portraying imagery including diptych formats and Various projections will be addressed. Art historic and contemporary examples will be studied.

Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

prerequisite: PT265 
PT360
Painting III
3 credits  6 Hours

This course focuses on the process of creative expression.  Students develop the process of generating, organizing and articulating visual ideas through various approaches and methods.  They will explore multiple solutions to visual problems with an emphasis on generating a repertoire of large and small sketches in various stages of resolution.  The goal is to find fresh visual responses to enrich students’ aesthetic vision and development.  This course is the prequel to Junior Painting Project.

Painting majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $225.00

prerequisite: PT265 
PT365
Painting III: Junior Project
3 credits  3 Hours

Building on sketches developed in fall semester Painting III students will develop a small body of realized work.  Questions of “finish/resolution”, surface treatment and other uses of visual vocabulary will be discussed.  Studio work time and instructional periods will be designated.  Team and visiting artist critiques augment the course, which culminates with an informal exhibition.

Painting majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.

prerequisite: PT360 
PT370
Figure in the Interior
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Students explore the conceptual and spatial problems involved in figure painting by integrating a spatial environment with figuration.  Students will use other artistic media, such as film stills, as reference while developing compositional motifs to achieve meaning and content in their work.

prerequisite: PT265 
PT371
Epic Painting
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course extends the bounds of the figure painting course to examine the processes involved in the creation of narrative/epic paintings. The instructor will provide examples of historical/epic paintings; the class will select one with which they will work that month. The idea is to interpret the basic composition but to change the context and possible meanings of the painting. Models will be on hand to rotate through the various poses taken from the chosen painting. Students will fill out the compositions with their own props, drawings, photographs, and whatever other reference seems appropriate. Class time will also be spent in critical examination and discussion of the work of artists in the epic tradition. The same models and paintings will be utilized in both sessions.

PT372
Figure and Portrait Painting
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Students focus on the study of the human figure, with particular emphasis on the importance of able draftsmanship. Students are encouraged to design pictures that are attentive to the placement of the figure in its surroundings, and to the relationship of tonal values throughout
the painting. Light is studied for its effect on the large planes of the body, for the ways in which it clarifies anatomical form, and for its contribution to the richness of color, which gives life to the figure. Students may work with paint or pastel.

prerequisite: PT105 
PT373
Figure Painting
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course brings traditional objectives into contemporary studio practice, addressing the various technical and aesthetic problems students often find in attempting to represent the human form in a meaningful and competent manner. Students will work through various methods and approaches to gain intentional characterization of the figure in space. At the same time the student will address more advanced formal strategies concerning illumination, surface quality and color relationships. Through the advancement of process and formal compositional strategies, students will consider content along with their own expressive intentions through studio instruction and critiques.
Estimated cost of materials: $250.00

prerequisite: PT105 
PT375
Narrative Painting
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course will explore the art of storytelling through painting.  Students will focus on creating a believable world with content and meaning, conveyed through such formal elements as light, space and weight.  A study of artists whose works deal with strong allegorical/narrative content will develop analytic, communicative, and expressive abilities, enabling students to create engaging, meaningful works of art.  Be prepared to discuss some ideas on the first day of class.

prerequisite: PT265 
PT380
Portrait
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course offers the student a systematic approach for the drawing and painting of portraits in a carefully controlled environment.  The initial focus is on, but not limited to, the study of the clothed model as sculptural form in space.  Light reflecting off the various planes of the subject is translated first into patterns of value, then into color.  Resemblance is a natural by-product of the process.  As students progress and display basic competence in generating a recognizable image, they will be encouraged to explore the use of social and painting conventions in making paintings that reflect more than a subject’s physical characteristics.  The role of the portrait and its changing stature will be discussed.  Students may work in any medium, but oil or watercolor is recommended.

Estimated cost of materials: $225.00

prerequisite: DR155  PT105 
PT405
Advanced Painting
3 credits  6 Hours

A synthesis of formal and expressive motifs in art-making as students look at, and respond to, ways painting has been re-defined by various 21st century artists.  Alternative media and non-traditional methodologies are studied within the context of formal elements and principles in art making.  Students expand their use of materials according to the conceptual needs of the work and traditional 2-D boundaries are challenged.  Actual and suggested movement, mixed media, spatial and installation demands are studied as outgrowths of students’ own work.

prerequisite: PT365 
PT420
Painting Topics
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The primary focus in this upper level studio class is the development of painting ideas with paint.  Students will learn to determine and direct the course of their own painting ideas using technical, formal and intuitive methods and concepts.  Subjects will include figure and subject matter chosen by each student.  All painting media are available for use.
Estimated cost of materials: $225.00

prerequisite: PT365 
PT422
Special Painting Topics
3 credits  6 Hours

In this upper level studio course, students learn to determine and direct the course of their own painting ideas using technical, formal and intuitive methods and concepts.  Subjects will include the figure as well as subject matter chosen by each student.  The first portion of the six-hour course will be reserved for lectures and personal research while the second portion will be devoted to painting in the studio.

prerequisite: PT265 
PT460
Senior Studio
4.5 credits  9 Hours

The Senior Studio course is an opportunity for BFA students in their final year of study to deploy skills and concepts learned throughout their educational experience in generating work or works for the Senior Exhibition that achieve independently conceived artistic goals.  The production and development of artwork through disciplined studio practice is supported and evaluated through individual weekly consultations with faculty members and through periodic group critiques.  End of term critiques with faculty and peers serve to highlight individual progress.  At least 13.5 hours of independent work is expected each week.

Prerequisite: Successful (a grade of C- or above) completion of PT365.

prerequisite: PT365 
PT465
Senior Studio
4.5 credits  9 Hours

The Senior Studio course is an opportunity for BFA students in their final year of study to deploy skills and concepts learned throughout their educational experience in generating work or works for the Senior Exhibition that achieve independently conceived artistic goals.  The production and development of artwork through disciplined studio practice is supported and evaluated through individual weekly consultations with faculty members and through periodic group critiques.  End of term critiques with faculty and peers serve to highlight individual progress.  At least 13.5 hours of independent work is expected each week.

Prerequisite: Successful (a grade of C- or above) completion of PT460.

prerequisite: PT460 

Illustration

ILU100
Introduction to Illustration
3 credits  4 Hours

Introduction to Illustration will run in two 2-hour sessions and attendance in both is required.  This class will explore of drawing as a means of thought and communication.  Specified problems in ideation, graphic interpretation, and visual semantics.  Projects emphasize a variety of illustrative approaches, craft, and mastery of tools.  In keeping with its credit structure, a minimum of nine weekly hours of students’ time (including class meeting hours) are expected to be devoted to fulfilling course requirements.
Illustration majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

prerequisite: DR155PT105PT161SC155SC166
ILU130
Digital Illustration I
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is a comprehensive exploration of digital image-making.  This course examines both “paint” (raster) and “draw” (vector) imaging.  Techniques to draw and paint directly into the computer are explored.  Student work is directed towards learning print-based applications.

ILU155
Illustration I
3 credits  6 Hours

Techniques, subjects, and scope unique to the field will be examined through the creation of visual solutions to communication needs.  Typography will be introduced, and the relationship between illustration, design and fine art will be explored.  Projects focus on interpreting written material in a visual form.

Illustration majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $375.00 (ILU155 and ILU250 combined)

prerequisite: ILU100
ILU250
Illustration II
3 credits  6 Hours

A development from Illustration I, Illustration II focuses on an understanding of the unique needs and consistent issues in the development sequential format solutions, and the development of a productive personal process.  Emphasis is given to visual problem solving and integration of vision and vehicle.

Illustration majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $375.00 (ILU155 and ILU250 combined)

prerequisite: ILU155
ILU275
Special Topics
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Special topics will be chosen annually by the Chair to provide the most appropriate additional focus for students enrolled in the earlier stages of the Illustration Program.  Topics may include Children’s Book Illustration, Traditional Illustration Mediums, Concept Art, Storyboarding, and Illustration for Publication.

Estimated cost of materials: $99.00

prerequisite: DR155PT105SC155
ILU330
Digital Illustration II
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is an exploration of time-based illustration projects with special application to the web utilizing a variety of software including Flash.
Estimated cost of materials: $50.00

prerequisite: ILU355
ILU355
Illustration III
3 credits  6 Hours

In this course students begin to identify areas of special interest that they will explore more extensively in the Senior Studio.  The instructor will assist each student with project development and in identifying further skills needed for effective realization. 

Illustration majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.

prerequisite: ILU250
ILU400
Advanced Special Topics
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Special topics will be chosen annually by the Chair to provide the most appropriate additional focus for students enrolled in the Illustration program.  Topics may include Graphic Novel Illustration, Concept Illustration, and Illustration in the Entertainment Industry for games and films.

ILU420
Production and Professional Practice
3 credits  6 Hours

A course covering the skills needed to prepare artwork for print or digital media. Course
outcome is for student to effectively manage the relationships among graphic designer, illustrator and printer. Special emphasis is given to current computer applications and
technology. Field trips to professional agencies will be arranged.

ILU460
Illustration Senior Project
6 credits  3 Hours

In consultation with faculty, seniors will undertake a comprehensive yearlong book project.  This project will investigate idea and narrative development, image sequencing, graphic format, typography, various book structures, and audience.  In keeping with its credit structure, a minimum of eighteen weekly hours of students’ time (including class meeting hours) are expected to be devoted to fulfilling course requirements.

prerequisite: ILU355
ILU465
Illustration Senior Project
6 credits  3 Hours

In consultation with faculty, seniors will undertake a comprehensive yearlong book project.  This project will investigate idea and narrative development, image sequencing, graphic format, typography, various book structures, and audience.  In keeping with its credit structure, a minimum of eighteen weekly hours of students’ time (including class meeting hours) are expected to be devoted to fulfilling course requirements.

prerequisite: ILU460
ILU470
Senior Portfolio
3 credits  4.5 Hours

This course provides an opportunity for independent project development utilizing the skills and concepts learned through the course.  The student may elect to do a variety of projects to demonstrate versatility or may chose a more focused body of work and technique.  In keeping with its credit structure, a minimum of nine weekly hours of students’ time (including class meeting hours) are expected to be devoted to fulfilling course requirements.

prerequisite: ILU355
ILU475
Senior Portfolio
3 credits  4.5 Hours

This course provides an opportunity for independent project development utilizing the skills and concepts learned through the course.  The student may elect to do a variety of projects to demonstrate versatility or may chose a more focused body of work and technique.  In keeping with its credit structure, a minimum of nine weekly hours of students’ time (including class meeting hours) are expected to be devoted to fulfilling course requirements.

prerequisite: ILU470
XXX
Studio Elective
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Choose elective studio course this semester.

Sculpture

SC150
Sculpture I
3 credits  6 Hours

This two semester introductory course explores the observation and duplication of three-dimensional form and composition. This course also serves as an introduction to the tools, materials and techniques of modeling the human figure. The history and traditions of sculpture will be discussed as a foundation and context for understanding class exercises. Observation of basic forms will begin the systematic study of convexity, concavity, planar orientation, projection, volume, silhouette, line, symmetry and proportion. These foundational concepts will be coupled with methods for accurately observing, measuring and depicting an object in three-dimensions. The synthesis of these methodologies will be the cornerstone for assessing figural archetypes and anatomical structures.

Modeling and Sculpting the Human Figure, Lanteri, ISBN-10: 0486250067, Retail $14.95
Estimated cost of materials: $199.00

SC155
Sculpture I
3 credits  6 Hours

This two semester introductory course explores the observation and duplication of three dimensional form and composition. This course also serves as an introduction to the tools, materials and techniques of modeling the human figure. The history and traditions of sculpture will be discussed as a foundation and context for understanding class exercises. Observation of basic forms will begin the systematic study of convexity, concavity, planar orientation, projection, volume, silhouette, line, symmetry and proportion. These foundational concepts will be coupled with methods for accurately observing, measuring and depicting an object in three-dimensions. The synthesis of these methodologies will be the cornerstone for assessing figural archetypes and anatomical structures.

Estimated cost of materials: $65.99

prerequisite: SC150
SC166
3D Design
1.5 credits  3 Hours

3-D Design introduces students to the basic principles, processes, and materials used in 3-D design and concept generation.  Students will learn to define form and understand the abstract principles of form through the transformation of materials.  Projects will teach students to imagine and create three-dimensional forms through the process of preparatory drawings, plans, and maquettes.  Presentation skills, craftsmanship, creativity, and critical judgment will be fostered.

Estimated cost of materials: $50.00

SC220
Figure Sculpture (Formerly titled Sculpture II)
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is part of a two-semester sequence which provides a structured transition from Sculpture I, offering a systematic method and further development of modeling, casting, and finishing techniques. Demonstrations are given on constructing the whole figure and details.  Proportions, modeling techniques, and anatomy are explored with emphasis on gesture and composition.  Once the student has constructed a basic figure, various finishing techniques are discussed.  The work of noteworthy sculptors from the past and present will be addressed, exploring the many methodologies used for sculpting the human form.

Sculpture majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
May be taken by juniors and seniors on a space-available basis to count towards fulfilling the Figure Sculpture requirement.
Estimated cost materials: $100.00

prerequisite: SC155
SC225
Figure Sculpture (Formerly titled Sculpture II)
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is part of a two-semester sequence which provides a structured transition from Sculpture I, offering a systematic method and further development of modeling, casting, and finishing techniques. Demonstrations are given on constructing the whole figure and details.  Proportions, modeling techniques, and anatomy are explored with emphasis on gesture and composition.  Once the student has constructed a basic figure, various finishing techniques are discussed.  The work of noteworthy sculptors from the past and present will be addressed, exploring the many methodologies used for sculpting the human form.

Sculpture majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
May be taken by juniors and seniors on a space-available basis to count towards fulfilling the Figure Sculpture requirement.
Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

prerequisite: SC220
SC240
Relief Sculpture
3 credits  6 Hours

(Offered every other year.)
This course is concerned with learning the language and techniques of sculptural relief.  The students construct a sculptural relief using one point perspective.  Emphasis is placed on developing a differentiation between foreground, middle ground, and background, leading to the introduction of scale and space in a manner that is closely aligned with painting.  Students will be introduced to the various forms of relief: rilievo schiacciato (shallow relief), bas relief (low relief), mezzo rilievo (mid-relief), and alto rilievo (high relief).  Projects will be developed utilizing either carving or modeling techniques.

Estimated cost of materials: $85.00

prerequisite: SC155
SC241
Bas Relief Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Students will undertake a series of studies from the model to develop the necessary skills and techniques of observing three-dimensional form and transforming it into a relatively flat two-dimensional surface.  Bas relief sculptures will be a fraction of an inch to a few inches deep, and employ the contours of the elements depicted to define their spatial relationships.

prerequisite: SC155
SC242
Reductive Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course offers the opportunity for students to explore the reductive method to create sculpture, in a variety of media including (but not limited to) stone, wood, foam, and plaster.  Students will be guided on an individual basis based on their self-selected projects, with specific tools and techniques for each.  Direct carving, as well as indirect carving and enlargement will be discussed, as well as a variety of solutions for confronting a block of material.

prerequisite: SC155SC166
SC248
Installation Art/Site-Specific Sculpture
3 credits  3 Hours

This multi-discipline course offers the possibility for students to take a step past the singular work of art residing in a frame or on a pedestal, to developing 2 and 3-dimensional art that commands a space.  Space, site-specific art, construction materials, installation methods, suspension, and lighting are some of the topics to be covered.  This course is open to students working in all media, including painting, drawing, and sculpture.  (Students are expected to do a minimum of 6 hours of outside work each week for this course.)

prerequisite: SC155SC166
SC254
Portrait Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

In this course, students will model from life, at first using points and measurements.  By training the eye in this way, students will begin to see and understand three-dimensional planes, forms, and the construction of the head and will work toward achieving a likeness reflecting the character of the model.  Throughout the course, students are encouraged and guided in developing their own interpretation of the model through a pose of the head and its expression.  Students will also explore the creative exploration of portraiture by altering physical features and exaggerating characteristics of the model.
Estimated cost of materials: $200.00

prerequisite: SC155
SC255
Portrait Sculpture
3 credits  6 Hours

In this course, students will model from life, at first using points and measurements.  By training the eye in this way, students will begin to see and understand three-dimensional planes, forms, and the construction of the head and will work toward achieving a likeness reflecting the character of the model.  Throughout the course, students are encouraged and guided in developing their own interpretation of the model through a pose of the head and its expression.  Students will also explore the creative exploration of portraiture by altering physical features and exaggerating characteristics of the model.

Estimated cost of materials: $200.00

prerequisite: SC155
SC260
Terracotta Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of terracotta sculpture.  Students will be introduced to the history of terracotta sculpture and its various forms and traditions. Utilizing models, students will create a series of sketches, studies, and maquettes, which will then be kiln fired.  By the end of the course, students will create an independently conceived sculpture, suitable to be fired.

prerequisite: SC155
SC275
Sculpture Composition II
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is a continuation of the process of concept formation and sculptural manifestation as introduced in 3-D Design.  Class projects will entail the application of the principles of sculptural design, including but not limited to the following: rhythm, movement, complexity, simplicity, repetition, duplication, variety, balance, proportion, mass, volume, space, and light.  Assignments will require the employment of a variety of media and techniques.  Students will learn to develop individual projects through the process of concept development, proposal, preparatory drawing, maquettes, and experimentation.  Students will be expected to critically assess their own work to clarify ideas and articulate artistic achievement.  At the end of the semester, students may be assessed by faculty members from other disciplines within the college, in addition to the instructor.

Sculpture majors must earn a minimum grade of C- in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

prerequisite: SC220
SC291
Sculpture Écorché
1.5 credits  3 Hours

(Offered periodically according to enrollment.)
Students will study the anatomy of the human figure by thoughtfully constructing a thirty-two inch écorché (flayed figure) sculpture in plastiline.  Students begin by studying and constructing the skeletal system, followed by the musculature.

Estimated cost of materials: $215.00

prerequisite: SC155
SC298
Animal Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course provides an opportunity for students to study the anatomical structures, habitats, gestures, movements, and behaviors of various animals to create sculpture.  Students will learn to create anatomically correct and dynamic sculptures in various media through the utilization of research materials such as books, photo images, and videos.

prerequisite: SC155
SC315
Rapid Pose Figure Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The theme of this course is to generate an understanding of human gesture and general construction through rapid, small-scale sketches.  Proportions, modeling techniques, materials, and anatomy are explored to assist the ability to swiftly and efficiently depict the body in space, gesture, and composition.

prerequisite: SC155
SC330
Mold and Casting Workshop
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Mold-making is explored through various techniques and materials for constructing a mold.  Casting from the mold is examined by introducing an assortment of materials, such as plaster, ultracal, FGR95 used with polymers, cement, epoxy, polyester resin, polyurethane resin, and wax, which is used for the lost wax bronze casting process.  The bronze foundry process of “raw casting” is introduced, which includes welding, chasing, and bronze patination.  Students are required to make a mold and finish a cast in the materials of their choosing.

Estimated cost of materials: $375.00

prerequisite: SC225
SC335
Mold and Casting Workshop
1.5 credits  3 Hours

Mold-making is explored through various techniques and materials for constructing a mold.  Casting from the mold is examined by introducing an assortment of materials, such as plaster, ultracal, FGR95 used with polymers, cement, epoxy, polyester resin, polyurethane resin and wax, which is used for the lost wax bronze casting process.  The bronze foundry process of “raw casting” is introduced, which includes welding, chasing, and bronze patination.  Students are required to make a mold and finish a cast in the materials of their choosing.

Estimated cost of materials: $375.00

prerequisite: SC255
SC340
High Relief Composition
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The course will teach students the principles and techniques of the high-relief format, where more than fifty percent of the depth is extended from the background plane, possibly with undercuts.  The class will undertake an examination of reliefs from history to understand principles that can be applied in a contemporary context.  Assignments will include preparatory drawings and reliefs modeled in clay.

prerequisite: SC155
SC345
Subtractive Carving Class
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This course will focus on subtractive sculpture carving using different mediums such as wood, plaster and perhaps stone, if time and weather permit. Students will familiarize themselves with the tools and methods of woodcarving. First they will design a Klean Klay sculpture of their own choosing, followed by drawing flat 2D shapes of their sculptural model onto a block of wood. Next they will remove negative areas of their wood block. The process will progress from simple to complex. When the woodcarving is finished students will sand and varnish or paint their wooden sculptures.

Estimated cost of materials: $25.00

prerequisite: SC155
SC346
Stone Carving
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is designed to introduce students to the tools, techniques, and materials of sculpting in stone.  Basic and more advanced principles of the reductive process are covered, including the proper use of manual, pneumatic and electric tools, direct versus indirect carving, the employment of calipers and measurements, models for 1:1 or enlargement reference, abrasives, and finishing techniques.  Additionally, the characteristics of different stones are discussed, including marble, limestone, alabaster, travertine and granite.  The practical components of the course are supplemented with slide presentations examining stone sculpture from archaic times to the twenty-first century.  Important historical artworks are discussed, as well as the use of stone as a contemporary artistic medium.

prerequisite: SC150
SC360
Figure Sculpture II
3 credits  6 Hours

A deeper exploration of the sculpted figure is presented in this course.  Working from the live model and from imagination, students will examine various ways of utilizing form, materials, scale and style to create complex figural compositions with unique expressive force. The work of noteworthy sculptors from the past and present will be discussed, and the many methodologies used to sculpt the human form by contemporary artists will be presented by the instructor.
Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

prerequisite: SC225
SC366
Figure Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This class is designed to give students a greater understanding of the varieties of artistic sculptural expression that use the human form. In addition to modeling the figure from life, class time will be devoted to lectures, discussions and assignments designed to give each student a forum within which to explore the creative possibilities of their own artistic
sensibilities. There will be no monitored session for this class, but students will be expected to fulfill weekly assignments.

prerequisite: SC155
SC370
Life-Size Figure Sculpture
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The purpose of the Figure Sculpture courses is to provide students with a complete understanding of sculpting the human figure.  This section of Figure Sculpture is for students who wish to work on a full-size figure based on a maquette developed in class.  Students will work from a live model to enlarge this maquette.  Special attention will be given to armature construction, figure structure, and solving the technical difficulties of working on a large scale.

Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

prerequisite: SC225
SC375
Sculpture Composition III
3 credits  6 Hours

This course is intended for Junior Sculpture majors in the BFA program.  The course involves students working with compositional concepts learned in prior courses to create individually conceived projects.  Group critiques will take place at the end of each assignment.  This course will end with the completion of a project chosen by the student involving his or her own creative ideas and media.  At the end of the semester, students may be assessed by faculty members from other disciplines within the college, in addition to the instructor.

Sculpture majors must receive a C- or above in this course to receive credit within their major.
Estimated cost of materials: $100.00

prerequisite: SC275
SC480
Senior Studio
4.5 credits  9 Hours

The Senior Studio course is an opportunity for BFA students in their final year of study to deploy skills and concepts learned throughout their educational experience in generating work or works for the Senior Exhibition that achieve independently conceived artistic goals.  The production and development of artwork through disciplined studio practice is supported and evaluated through individual weekly consultations with faculty members and through periodic group critiques.  End of term critiques with faculty and peers serve to highlight individual progress.  (In keeping with the course’s credit structure, students dedicate 13.5 hours per week to fulfill course requirements.)

prerequisite: SC375
SC485
Senior Studio
4.5 credits  9 Hours

The Senior Studio course is an opportunity for BFA students in their final year of study to deploy skills and concepts learned throughout their educational experience in generating work or works for the Senior Exhibition that achieve independently conceived artistic goals.  The production and development of artwork through disciplined studio practice is supported and evaluated through individual weekly consultations with faculty members and through periodic group critiques.  End of term critiques with faculty and peers serve to highlight individual progress.  (In keeping with the course’s credit structure, students dedicate 13.5 hours per week to fulfill course requirements.)

prerequisite: SC480
SCXXX*
Sculpture Elective
1.5 credits  3 Hours

The College offers a range of sculpture courses.  Please review the semester’s course schedule for specific information regarding topic, the instructor of record, and time/days offered.

Liberal Arts

AHS170
Survey of Western Art History
3 credits  3 Hours

This is a two-semester required course examining major periods, styles, and themes in Western Art.  The first semester examines works from the Prehistoric era to the Gothic period; the second semester continues the study of styles and movements from the Renaissance through the twentieth century.  Lectures and readings are devoted to introducing students to a repertoire of significant painting, sculpture, and architecture, establishing a historical framework for works of art, and exploring these works and their meanings within their original cultural contexts.  Students are also challenged to expand their observation and vocabulary skills through close formal analysis.  Exam essays and writing assignments develop research skills and promote the development of analytic and critical thinking.  Requirements include weekly readings, museum visits, two exams, two short presentations, and two writing assignments.  Completion of both semesters of this course is required for entry into all upper level Art History courses.

Required Text:
Art History, Volume One, Fourth Edition, Marilyn Stokstad; Michael W. Cothren, ISBN-13: 978-0-205-74420-6.  Retail Price: $160.40.

AHS175
Survey of Western Art History
3 credits  3 Hours

This is a two-semester required course examining major periods, styles, and themes in Western Art.  The first semester examines works from the Prehistoric era to the Gothic period; the second semester continues the study of styles and movements from the Renaissance through the twentieth century.  Lectures and readings are devoted to introducing students to a repertoire of significant painting, sculpture, and architecture, establishing a historical framework for works of art, and exploring these works and their meanings within their original cultural contexts.  Students are also challenged to expand their observation and vocabulary skills through close formal analysis.  Exam essays and writing assignments develop research skills and promote the development of analytic and critical thinking.  Requirements include weekly readings, museum visits, two exams, two short presentations, and two writing assignments.  Completion of both semesters of this course is required for entry into all upper level Art History courses.

Required Text:
Art History, Volume Two, Fourth Edition, Marilyn Stokstad; Michael W. Cothren, ISBN-13: 978-0-205-74421-3.  Retail Price: $160.40.

AHS250
Modern Art, Modernity, and Modernism
3 credits  3 Hours

The second half of the nineteenth century witnessed the rise of the European avant-garde: the Realists, Impressionists, Post- Impressionists, Symbolists, Cubists, and Surrealists. Rapid social, economic, and political changes encompassed a revolution
in communication systems and technology. The first half of the twentieth century saw a shift from European to American modernism and the rise of abstract expressionism as Clement Greenberg’s answer to a purely autonomous art form. This course will explore art and visual culture in relation to urban capitalism, colonialism, nationalism and internationalism tracing theories of representation, perception, and modernism from the 19th to the 20th centuries.

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS275
History of Illustration
3 credits  3 Hours

This course is an introduction to the development of Illustration from its fine arts roots to become an independent discipline.  Students are introduced to pioneers in the field, historical styles, techniques, reproduction and media influences, and current fields of illustration.  Course is required by Illustration majors and may be taken as an elective for majors in Drawing, Sculpture, and Painting to be applied towards the additional courses needed for the Art History minor.

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS375
Contemporary Art and Art Criticism
3 credits  3 Hours

This course will explore visual art and criticism from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, concentrating on post 1945 approaches, with special interest in contemporary art practices of the last two decades.  Assignments will include written and verbal critiques of art and critical texts in the form of essays, presentations, and classroom debates.

Required:
Criticizing Art: Understanding the Contemporary, Third edition, Terry Barrett; McGraw-Hill, ISBN-13: 9780073379197, ISBN: 0073379190
Retail Price: $72.95

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS470
Art History Seminar: Renaissance Art
3 credits  3 Hours

This course will examine developments in European art and visual culture from the late thirteenth century through the late sixteenth century. Areas of study will include painting, sculpture, architecture, drawing, printmaking, domestic arts, engineering, theory, etc. In addition to addressing “who” had contributed to this period, the course will attempt to
understand “why” and “how” objects of this period were made and used. We will critique traditional notions of the Renaissance, looking as much as possible with a “period eye” at what contemporaries of the time may have believed. The primary course text will be Paoletti and Radke’s Art in Renaissance Italy, 3rd edition (2005).

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS471
Baroque and Rococo Art and Architecture
3 credits  3 Hours

The term “baroque” and “rococo” can be applied to a variety of time periods and concepts,though this course will address the art and architecture of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. At issue are the pictorial and architectural approaches to theatrical display, emotional expression, gravitas, spatial concepts, local contexts, religious expression, political manipulation, military display, commercial gain, psychological condition, social status, aristocratic representation, portraiture, scientific revelations, visual theory, the commonplace, material culture, decorative schemes, eclectic copying, and other visual and rhetorical forms of the period.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS472
Leonardo da Vinci: Theories of Art and Science
3 credits  3 Hours

Although Leonardo had not referred to himself specifically as a “scientist” or as an “artist”, he wrote about scienza and the arts of painting, sculpture, and engineering. This course addresses his largely theoretical approaches to these arts and to early modern “sciences” such as geometry, arithmetic, and natural philosophy. From Leonardo’s 6000 drawings, three dozen paintings, treatise literature and notes, reconstructions of his machines and inventions, from other contemporary sources, and a possible sculpture or two, the course gleans the essential theoretical and practical pursuits that had made him the popular artist/engineer of his day, not to mention the “genius” that we think we know today. The course attempts to locate Leonardo within the context of his time with the help of information about the materials, sources, and activities that were closest to the business of his various personal achievements.

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS473
New Age: Twentieth-Century Art from 1900-1945
3 credits  3 Hours

Students will examine the varied directions of painting and sculpture in the first half of the twentieth century. Discussions and will focus on the emergence of a sense of modernity, the myth of the Future at the turn of the millennium, the optimism of the machine age, and the idea of newness and possibility of the avant-garde.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS474
Rule Britannia: The Art of Britain from the Tudors to the Windsors
3 credits  3 Hours

This course is inspired by the close proximity of the only comprehensive collection of British
art outside of Tate Gallery in London, at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven. A range of artists and their works available in this unique collection is studied closely, and students choose their course projects from it. Examples of topics to be explored are the Continental Holbein and Van Dyck as artists for the Tudor and Stuart courts; the development of a native English visual language and subject matter in the “modern moral subjects” of Hogarth; the strong development of the primary English subject matter of landscape and portraiture; the continuing trend for subject pictures and social narrative through the Victorian age; and the involvement of English art in the development of the artistic trends of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Other cultural themes to be considered are: the relation of English art to that of the Continent, particularly Italian, Dutch, and French; the association of the visual arts with the preeminent literature of English poets, playwrights, and novelists; the concurrent sensibilities of the practical and naturalistic with the poetic and visionary; and the ever present figurative tradition in the twentieth century from Bacon to Freud and Saville, and its counterpoint at the same time in abstraction and conceptual work, from the Vorticists of the 1910s to the Young British Artists of the 1990s.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS475
Elevated Above Reality: Post-Impressionism 1880-1920
3 credits  3 Hours

Coined as a movement in 1906 by English critic Roger Fry, Post-Impressionism is a blanket term that covers the many responses to art-making after the peak of Impressionism in the 1870s. This course investigates the visual and cultural contributions of seminal Post-Impressionists, such as Georges Seurat, Paul Cezanne, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, and Henri Toulouse-Lautrec. The course is inclusive of other types of visual responses during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The art of the Synthetists, the Symbolists, the Nabis, the Camden Town and Bloomsbury Groups in England, and sculptors from Rodin to Maillol are included in our study. Incorporated are themes of representation, imagination, perception, urban capitalism and leisure, colonialism, nationalism, and gender.

AHS476
La Città Del Fiori: The Art of Renaissance Florence 1300-1600
3 credits  3 Hours

Students will closely examine Italian Renaissance art in the Tuscan city of Florence. From its flowering in the fourteenth century with the narrative cycles in Santa Maria Novella and Santa Croce, to the maturation of Early Renaissance sculpture and painting in the fifteenth century, to the realization of a High Renaissance in the Florentine works of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael, to the sixteenth-century Mannerists and the founding of the Florentine Academy in 1562, the uninterrupted development of art in Renaissance Florence allows for a thorough study of three centuries of a city’s artistic output. Highlights of architectural accomplishments are also considered, foremost the building of Brunelleschi’s dome atop Santa Maria del Fiore. Important contextual discussions, especially on patronage (particularly by the Medici), its dynastic, religious, civic, and commercial demands, as well as on the reception by the viewing public of the time, form a critical component of our study of the significant art of Renaissance Florence.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS477
Flesh & Blood: The Body in Modern and Contemporary Art
3 credits  3 Hours

At the beginning of the new century, we can, with hindsight, more clearly understand the endurance of the representation of the human form and its coexistence alongside the development of an abstract visual language during the twentieth century. This course explores the various ways the persistent representation of the figure in the last one hundred years
can be interpreted in European and American culture. How are concepts of the natural, the ideal, and the antique still manifested? How do the works convey differing perceptions of the body and the impact of gender, ethnic, and economic status? Why, in the wake of abstraction, photography, and computer technology has the act of representing the human form remained relevant? The various presentations and meanings of human embodiment in painting and sculpture are examined, along with various time based media, from the most realist to the more fragmented, and how these objects and images are inflected with particular social identifications.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS478
Enlightenment, Imagination, & Empiricism: Art in Europe 1750-1850
3 credits  3 Hours

This course examines the early Modern period in art through examination of Western European art, traditionally categorized as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Realism. Politically, the course moves from entrenched monarchy to revolution, empire to republic. Stylistically, the art displays elements of severe classicism, bravura and artifice, quiet naturalism, turbulent emotionality, the tension between color and line, between realism and abstraction – many of these dichotomies a hold over from the seventeenth-century rivalry between the colorism of Rubens and the linearity of Poussin. While discussing individual artists and key objects, their style and meaning, the subject matter of the course will always be returned to the cultural forces and contexts that influenced the outcome of art. Class discussions are based on readings and lecture material. Paper topics and coordinating presentations derive from the museum collections of Yale University.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS479
Old Masters
3 credits  3 Hours

This course examines old master painters, sculptors, draftspeople, and printmakers, addressing the European workshop tradition from Giotto to Goya. By focusing on individual artists and principle masterworks, the course considers trajectories of artistic development and historical reception that have led to the consideration of an artist as master or ‘old master,’ or an artwork as masterwork. Included are in-depth case studies and comparisons of artists’ methods, materials, concepts of style, pictorial composition, iconography, patrons, business practices, possible motives, and socio-political and historical contexts. As a means of assessing the varieties of activity closest to the creative process, methods of engagement include class discussions, student presentations, essays and exams.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
AHS480
Indian Art
3 credits  3 Hours

The course presents aspects of Indian art over a period of 2000 years. The lectures are divided into four main sections: the art of Buddhism, the Hindu temple, Islamic art, and the art of colonial and post-colonial India. The course will focus on architectural sites, sculpture, painting, manuscripts, and photography.  Topics will include rasa theory, Indus Valley Civilization and Ashoka, Sanchi and Amravati, Kushan and Gupta periods, cave monasteries and temples, Darshan, sensuous images within sacred spaces, Mamallapuram, Chola temples, bronze sculpture and temple cities, the sultanate period, early Mughals, Akbari and Jahangiri periods, the Shah Jahani world, the Taj Mahal, Rajput art and architecture, Portuguese and British art and architecture in India, modernism and tradition, and contemporary art. Students will be encouraged through class discussions and assignments to bring their own ways of looking at this art, to read critically in light of what they see, and to consider new approaches to the material.

Indian Art, Dehejia, ISBN-13: 978-0714834962, Retail Price $27.95

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS482
History of Narrative Film
3 credits  3 Hours

Viewing iconic film texts in the context of the artistic, social and national milieus which fostered them, this course will cover the history of film from its abstract beginnings to its primarily narrative present. Important film techniques and national film movements will be introduced as we discuss individual film texts; weekly film viewings will include POTEMKIN, CITIZEN KANE, A BOUT DE SOUFFLE and METROPOLIS among others.

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS483
Art History Seminar: Italian Renaissance Art
3 credits  3 Hours

This course explores the flowering of art and culture in the Italian city-states of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.  Students will gain a deeper understanding of the many different and competing styles in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, architecture, drawing, and printmaking.  We will discuss the tensions between local and individual styles and look critically at terms such as “High Renaissance” and “Mannerism.”  Assignments will be based on original objects, primary sources, and more recent scholarship to develop skills in close looking, close reading, and critical thinking required of art historical scholarship.
Required Text:
Italian Renaissance Art, Stephen Campbell and Michael Cole; Thames and Hudson, ISBN: 978-0-500-28943-3.  Retail Price: $112.50.
Optional Text:
Painting and Experience in Fifteenth Century Italy, Michael Baxandall (Oxford, 1972).

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS484
Art History Seminar: Painters’ Painters
3 credits  3 Hours

What makes a “Painters’ painter”? Who are the artists of the past that most inspire painters of today? This seminar explores the essences of the medium of painting; the tools, materials, and mindsets of the painter; and what it means to work in a painterly style. We will look closely at artists associated with painterly brush stroke such as Titian, Velasquez, Delacroix, Manet, Sargent, de Kooning, and Pearlstein, among others. We will explore the idea of influence through assignments including an interview with a contemporary painter, and a final research project about a historical painter’s influences and techniques.

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS485
Art History Seminar: Art and Visual Culture in Japan
3 credits  3 Hours

Japanese art is an important expression of human aesthetic experience that inspires artists globally. This interdisciplinary approach to Japanese visual art from ancient to the 21st century will consider examples of visual media in the context of Japanese literature, history, and religions, examining how this specific tradition develops, changes, and interacts with other traditions of art through the ages. Topics include religious art (primarily sculpture and architecture) and pictorial traditions (narrative picture scrolls, prints, and paintings).

prerequisite: AHS170AHS175
AHS4XX
Art History Seminar
3 credits  3 Hours

Each semester, an upper-level art history seminar is offered, with topics that change regularly.  All students seeking the BFA degree must complete one seminar as a requirement for graduation.  Please review the semester’s course schedule for specific information regarding seminar topic/s, the instructor of record, and times/dates offered.

prerequisite: AHS175AHS170
ANA190
Anatomy I
1.5 credits  1.5 Hours

This course is an exploration of the physiology of the joint and muscular systems of the human body in a series of illustrated lectures.  Emphasis is placed on physiological principles governing the body’s movements.  Points of intersection between such principles and artistic concerns are also addressed.  The live model is present during the lectures on a periodic basis to demonstrate and vivify course material.  Required weekly readings from the course text, The Anatomy of Movement, by Blandine Calais-Germain, supplement information presented in the lectures.  Students are evaluated on the basis of a graded final examination. 

Estimated cost of materials: $25.00
Required Text:
The Anatomy of Movement, 2007 Edition, Blandine Calais-Germain; Eastland Press, ISBN: 0-939616-57-2.  Retail Price $34.95.
OR
The Anatomy of Movement, 1993 Edition, Blandine Calais-Germain; Eastland Press, ISBN-13: 978-0-939-61617-3, ISBN: 0-939616-17-3.

ANA195
Anatomy II
1.5 credits  1.5 Hours

Physiological principles covered in Anatomy I are related to a system of description that proceeds on the basis of comparisons between anatomical structures and drawable Euclidean-type solids. Ways in which the representation of the human body by means of such comparisons can be seen to serve goals common to both scientific and artistic endeavors—particularly the goals of comprehensibility, regularity and predictability—are established. Students prepare individual projects delineating the skeletal and muscular systems for figures they either have chosen from among artistic representations or that they themselves have generated. 

Estimated cost of materials: $25.00
Required Text:
The Anatomy of Movement, 2007 Edition, Blandine Calais-Germain; Eastland Press, ISBN: 0-939616-57-2.  Retail Price $34.95.
OR
The Anatomy of Movement, 1993 Edition, Blandine Calais-Germain; Eastland Press, ISBN-13: 978-0-939-61617-3, ISBN: 0-939616-17-3.

prerequisite: ANA190
ENG050
English Preparatory
1 credits  1 Hours

This course focuses on helping students to develop stronger critical reading and writing skills in preparation for their liberal arts coursework. Students undertake a variety of short writing assignments, including: a personal narrative; a comparison and contrast essay; an expository essay; a cause and effect essay; and a persuasive essay. Students also read models of each expository pattern and receive direct instruction in grammar and usage. Finally, students review the process of writing and documenting a research project and prepare an abstract on a literary topic.

ENG100
English Composition
3 credits  3 Hours

English Composition provides instruction in rhetoric and composition concepts and practices that enable students to write effectively at the college level. Students will develop strategies for constructing effective written arguments, analyzing the arguments of others, and conducting academic research. Emphasis will be placed on writing for different audiences, purposes, and contexts. As writing is a process, the various writing assignments throughout the semester will often require multiple drafts and peer-review sessions; cumulatively, students are expected to produce approximately 25 pages of polished writing, including a researched paper at the end of the semester. Required readings will include various essays and articles from the textbook and other sources.
Required Text:
Real Essays Interactive: A Brief Guide to Writing Essays, 1st Edition, Susan Anker; MacMillan Education.  ISBN: 978-1-457-65409-1, Retail Price: $37.99.

ENG105
English Literature & Composition
3 credits  3 Hours

Composition and Literature is a course that provides students guided practice in textual analysis, synthesis, and more sophisticated research practices. This writing-based course uses literature to teach and strengthen analytical skills and methods of literary analysis. As writing is a process, the various writing assignments throughout the semester will often require multiple drafts and peer-review sessions; cumulatively, students are expected to produce approximately 25 pages of polished writing, including a researched paper at the end of the semester. Required readings will include various works of short fiction from the textbook and other sources, as well as a novel.

HUM112
World Religions
3 credits  3 Hours

A survey of the belief systems, world views, and practices of religion from early historic cultures to the present day, with special focus on the major contemporary traditions (such as Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism) and their philosophical, historical, cultural, and artistic heritage.

The Illustrated World’s Religions, A Guide to Our Wisdom Traditions: First Edition (August 18, 1995), Huston Smith; HarperOne;  ISBN-13: 9780060674403, ISBN: 0060674407
Retail Price: $24.99

prerequisite: ENG105
HUM150
Western Philosophy
3 credits  3 Hours

This course is an introduction to the philosophical tradition in the West, wherein there will be a survey and critical examination of classics in philosophical discourse from Socrates through Sartre. At issue will be primary philosophical questions concerning topics such as knowledge, doubt, metaphysics, immortality, God, time, ethics, freedom, necessity, good and evil, the cosmos, the meaning of life, and some of the attempts to answer them.

Classics of Western Philosophy, Cahn, ISBN-13: 978-0872206373, Retail $44.00

HUM151
The Science and Philosophy of Art
3 credits  3 Hours

Students will examine optical and conceptual themes in Western Art from Plato to Seurat.  At issue are the theoretical and practical applications developed by Western artists and visual theorists.  Concentrating on pictorial traditions, the course addresses what artists, authors, and artist/engineers have referred to as theoretical, scientific, technical, mechanical, and purely mental solutions to optical, proportional, and quantitative visual problems.  General themes include philosophy, aesthetics, perspective, form, color, and mechanical devices, and discussions on intellectual training, notebooks, treatises, and collecting.

HUM153
Philosophy: Aesthetics
3 credits  3 Hours

A critical examination of the divorce of beauty and love that is a presupposition of the establishment of aesthetics and of a distinctly modern approach to art.  Readings will include Plato, Alberti, Baumgarten, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Freud, and Macuse. 

HUM154
Philosophy: Ethics
3 credits  3 Hours

What makes one act right, and another wrong?  What am I morally required to do for others?  What is the basis of morality anyway?  These are some of the questions raised in moral philosophy.  A careful examination of two of the most important attempts to answer them–the theories of John Stuart Mill and Immanuel Kant.  The problem of free will is also examined: Do we really have control over what we do, or are we merely the puppets of external causes?  If determinism is true, is moral responsibility impossible?  The course also briefly considers Hume on the nature of practical reason, as well as Hobbes on contractarianism.  Finally, Nietzsche’s attack on morality is examined.

HUM155
Forms of Narration
3 credits  3 Hours

This course introduces seminal concepts in narratology, from how stories are generated to how they are developed and implemented in a variety of forms. Included are analyses of short stories, novels, serial storytelling (novels, television), film and graphic narratives. The course will attempt to frame the possibilities for each of these forms; students will produce original stories, critical analyses of genres and a final project.
Required Texts:
Because They Wanted To, Gaitskill, ISBN-10: 0684841444, Retail $22.00
Persepolis vol. II, Satrapi, ISBN-10: 159497036X, Retail $11.95
A Visit From The Goon Squad, Eagan, ISBN-10: 0307592839, Retail $14.95

HUMXXX
Humanities Requirement
3 credits  3 Hours

All students are required to complete one humanities course. Humanities courses are generally offered during the fall semester, and should be taken when indicated on the planning sheet to ensure adequate progress towards degree and successful scheduling. Please review the semester’s course schedule for specific information regarding topic, the instructor of record, and time/days offered.

LBS490
Professional Practice
2 credits  3 Hours

This course examines the practical, philosophical and artistic challenges in maintaining a lifelong studio practice. Artists are entrepreneurs of the creative class; strategic planning and understanding of the business side of the art world is essential to becoming a resilient, self-reliant artist. This course covers multiple aspects of the business side of art including documentation, presentation and marketing of one’s artwork as well as information concerning exhibition, residency and grant opportunities; website development and social network practices; gallery representation, curatorial/museum work and other jobs in the field; and graduate school. Students will prepare a portfolio package, write artist statements, learn about budgets and filing systems, and do a slide presentation. Through class discussions, assignments, course materials and guest speakers, students are exposed to the various practitioners that comprise the art world and gain the necessary skills for their development as professional artists. Emphasis is placed on transitioning from the academic environment to the working world, including considerations of the varied careers in the creative fields.
Co-requisite: Senior Studio or Senior Portfolio.
Required Texts:
Art & Fear, Bayles & Orland, ISBN-13: 978-0961454739, Retail $12.95
ART/WORK, Bhandari & Melber, ISBN-13: 978-1416572336, Retail $16.95

MAT101
Concepts of Mathematics
3 credits  3 Hours

This course is designed to include a review of algebra, an introduction to logic and statistics, ancient number systems, geometry, as well as business and personal financial math with the goal of improving quantitative reasoning and establishing a working knowledge of several branches of mathematics.
Required Text:
Mathematical Ideas, 11th edition, Miller, ISBN-13: 978-0-321-36146-2.  Retail Price: $142.67.

MAT105
Mathematics
3 credits  3 Hours

Introductory and intermediate approaches to mathematical and geometrical problems. Topics include: sets, logic, ancient number systems, number theory, algebra, trigonometry, statistics, as well as business math with the goal to improving quantitative reasoning and approaches to business applications. 

Required Text:
Mathematical Ideas, 11th edition, Miller, ISBN-13: 978-0-321-36146-2.  Retail Price: $142.67.

PER150
Perspective
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This two-semester lecture course studies spatial illusion with specific reference to the convention of linear perspective.  In the first semester, students learn to represent simple geometric forms on a two-dimensional surface as they would appear in a three-dimensional space.  Homework assignments allow them to apply the various methods to more complex figures.  The second semester surveys cast shadows and reflections.  (Students are expected to do a minimum of 1.5 hours of outside work each week for the course.)

Estimated cost of materials: $35.00

PER155
Perspective
1.5 credits  3 Hours

This two-semester lecture course studies spatial illusion with specific reference to the convention of linear perspective.  In the first semester, students learn to represent simple geometric forms on a two-dimensional surface as they would appear in a three-dimensional space.  Homework assignments allow them to apply the various methods to more complex figures.  The second semester surveys cast shadows and reflections.  (Students are expected to do a minimum of 1.5 hours of outside work each week for the course.)
Estimated cost of materials: $35.00

SCI100
Science: Cognitive Development
4 credits  4 Hours

In this course we will discus the ways in which we process visual and auditory information, such as how we put things in categories, solve simple and complex problems, communicate with each other and with our pets, remember how to ride a bicycle, and how to get to New York City.  To answer these questions, we will read and discuss theory and research in cognitive development across the life span, focusing on infancy, childhood, and adolescence.  Topics will include perception, categorization, reasoning, theory of mind and autism, language and thought, multilingualism and second-language acquisition, social cognition, and memory. 

SCI101
Natural Science
4 credits  4 Hours

This course introduces students to the science of the natural world through first-hand field study, including investigations of the ecology of local environments such as estuaries, streams, forests, and wetlands; as well as examining the ancient natural history of southern Connecticut through paleontological and geological observations.  (Students are expected to do a minimum of 8 hours of outside work each week for this course.)
Required Text:
Connecticut Wildlife: Biodiversity, Natural History, and Conservation, Hammerson, G.A. 2004, Hanover, University Press of New England, ISBN 978-1-58465-369-1.  Retail Price: $39.95.

SCI102
Ecology of Landscapes and Organisms
4 credits  4 Hours

Ecology is the scientific study of how organisms (including humans) interact with each other and their non-living environment.  Students learn how these interactions shape the fundamental properties of biological populations, communities, ecosystems, and landscapes.  Topics include life histories, population growth, competition within and between species, predation, herbivory, parasitism, mutualisms (such as pollination and seed dispersal), distribution and abundance of species (community structure), species diversity, ecological succession, disturbance, nutrient cycling, and energy flow.  Human impact on the environment is explored, especially as it relates to invasive species and extinctions.  Ecological concepts and principles are illustrated through field trips to coastal, wetland, and terrestrial habitats throughout southern Connecticut’s remarkably diverse landscape, as well as through field investigations conducted on campus.

Elements of Ecology (seventh edition, paperback), Smith and Smith, ISBN 0-321-55957-6, Retail Price $137.80

SCIXXX
Science Requirement
4 credits  4 Hours

All students are required to complete one science course in addition to the fulfilling the College’s Anatomy requirement. Science courses are generally offered during the fall semester, and should be taken when indicated on the planning sheet to ensure adequate progress towards degree and successful scheduling. Please review the semester’s course schedule for specific information regarding topic, the instructor of record, and time/days offered.

SOC100
Introduction to Anthropology
3 credits  3 Hours

An introduction to the study of the human species, this course investigates human culture and the physical and cultural changes that have occurred over the last several million years.  Many of these changes have occurred gradually while others have occurred in quantum leaps.  The course will examine the relationship of the human species to these changes and to the natural and cultural environment to which we have adapted. 

SOC101
Archaeological Method & Theory
3 credits  3 Hours

Archaeological Method & Theory introduces students to the techniques and concepts used by archaeologist to find, recover, and interpret artifacts in an effort to reconstruct and understand the lives of earlier peoples. The class uses archaeological case studies, films, and hands-on examples of tools and other artifacts produced by stone-age hunters and more complex civilizations that lived throughout the world.

This course will run provisionally and will be assessed for final approval at the end of the 2010-2011 academic year.

prerequisite: ENG100
SOC102
Government and Politics
3 credits  3 Hours

The American Constitution is the oldest written Constitution still in practice in the world. The decisions made in the political arena affect each and every student, citizen, and resident of the United States. The goal of this course is to teach each of you how you may benefit from this system, how you may be harmed by the system, and what your role in that system may be. We are most interested in the “what is” questions. Who makes decisions? What factors influence those decisions? What is the impact of those decisions? So our first goal has those basic questions in mind. We will study Congress, the Executive branch, the Supreme Court, and other important institutions. However, a second set of important questions goes beyond the factual points and asks “what ought to be?” After all, these are the questions that decision-makers and those in power usually must answer, frequently claiming to have the support of you, the taxpayer, the voter, and the citizen. How much time should we give to new mothers off work? How long should we keep students in the classroom? How much money should we spend on missile defense? As we learn the framework in which these decisions are made, we will be discussing these types of issues and others in current political debate. At the end of the course, you will know how major decisions are made in American politics, what structural and institutional factors shape those decisions, and how to focus your thinking a little more in regards to some important issues. Most importantly, you will learn that decisions are rarely as clear-cut or easy as many political actors make them seem to be.

SOC103
Documentary Film
3 credits  3 Hours

This course examines the place of the non fiction film in the examination of social practices and communities from the late 19th century through the present. Beginning with the earliest ‘documents’ of the Lumiere Brothers, we view and examine important texts in the most important international film movements, from the visual anthropology of Robert Flaherty to the cinema verite of Rocha and Maysles Brothers. Topics to be examined include the ethics of documentary, the camera as participant/observer and the role of documentary in social action and change. Films include NANOOK OF THE NORTH, MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA, DON’T LOOK BACK, GREY GARDENS

SOC104
Globalism and Its Histories
3 credits  3 Hours

This course will explore the concept of the global through the lens of global cinema. Bolstered with readings from writers such as Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak, Salman Rushdie and Ann Stohler ,we will discuss the concept of globalism as it emerged in the 19th century and its development through to the contemporary. Films such as THE DARJEELING LIMITED, THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS, AGUIRRE THE WRATH OF GOD and SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE will serve as cornerstones for our discussion of globalism across the continents and throughout history. There will be two essay tests on the readings and films assigned and a class presentation as well as a final research project.

SOC105
Archaeology of New England: The Connecticut River
3 credits  3 Hours

The Connecticut River has been the focal point for prehistoric and historic cultural adaptations and was the center of Native American culture for nearly ten millennia.  With the arrival of Europeans in the 15th and 16th centuries, Native American society encountered major changes as the new residents saw the Great River as an entrepreneurial opportunity.  An explosion of maritime activity followed that evolved into an unrivaled Connecticut Valley industrial complex.  The course takes a cultural-chronological approach and focuses on particular peoples and their relationship to the river and the river valley.  The presentation of data is based upon written and physical artifacts leading to a reconstruction of the social, economic, technologic, and ideological approaches to life within this region. 

SOC106
Declarations of Virtue: The Political Ideals that Make America Pulse
3 credits  3 Hours

This course will trace the evolution of American political and social institutions from the colonial period to the present.  We will examine the dominant ideological paradigms underlying the functions of the state using a mixture of original documents, speeches, films, illustrations, and commercial art.  Each branch and level of government will be outlined during the course of the semester and by the end, you will understand how the various social and political institutions function alone and interdependently.
Required Text:
American Political Thought, 6th Edition,
 Kenneth M. Dolbeare
and Michael S. Cummings, 2009, ISBN: 978-0-87289-972-8.  Retail Price: $66.00.

SOC110
Observation, Description, and Style
3 credits  3 Hours

This is an interdisciplinary course which will focus on the art and practice of observation, description, and analysis and corollary issues such as audience, point of view, framing,space, semiotics and detail.  Most of our texts will be drawn from non fiction, and the social sciences.

Into the Wild, Krakauer, ISBN-10: 0385486804, Retail $19.99

Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Bauby, ISBN-10: 0375701214, Retail $15.00

SOC125
Prehistory of North America
3 credits  3 Hours

This course focuses on Native American groups in North America and their cultural adaptation to the ever changing environment.  Chronology is the organizing element of this course, which begins with the earliest evidence and hypotheses of the peopling of the New World from both Asian and European sources.  The course concentrates on early Native American cultural adaptations to the Late and Post Pleistocene period environments.  Corresponding Native American adaptations are analyzed. 

SOC135
Anthropology: Cultural Dynamics
3 credits  3 Hours

The social, political, economic, and environmental factors that can impact human settlement, subsistence, and interaction.  Cross cultural examples from human prehistory and the present day are used to illustrate the dynamic nature of culture.

SOC191
Humor in Society
3 credits  3 Hours

This course examines humor as a significant form of creative expression in social and political life.  In recent decades, social scientists of all persuasions have examined humor and its relationship to the understanding and negotiation of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.  This course will introduce students to the burgeoning field of humor studies. Topics will include different theories of humor, the relationship between humor and creativity, the political use of humor, the role of humor in maintaining personal and social identity, and the social aspects of laughter.  Although the focus will be on contemporary humor in U.S. American society and media, students will be introduced to different cultural perspectives on the humorous.  Class meetings will balance lectures and critical discussions, and assignments will ask students to draw upon their own personal and cultural histories.

prerequisite: ENG105
SOCXXX
Social Science Requirement
3 credits  3 Hours

All students are required to complete two social science courses. Social science courses are offered during both fall and spring semesters, and should be taken when indicated on the planning sheet to ensure adequate progress towards degree and successful scheduling. Please review the semester’s course schedule for specific information regarding topic, the instructor of record, and time/days offered.